#FloridaWildlifeCorridor Instagram Photos & Videos

FloridaWildlifeCorridor - 3.3k posts

Latest #FloridaWildlifeCorridor Posts

  • This Reddish Egret lives about 7 minutes from my house and so I visit it often. Their colors are awesome to me, especially their pink bill. I was blessed to capture this one flying right by me.
  • This Reddish Egret lives about 7 minutes from my house and so I visit it often. Their colors are awesome to me, especially their pink bill. I was blessed to capture this one flying right by me.
  •  11  2  29 minutes ago
  • A baby black-necked stilt at Lake Apopka Wildlife Drive. They were a joy to follow around and photograph.
  • A baby black-necked stilt at Lake Apopka Wildlife Drive. They were a joy to follow around and photograph.
  •  87  7  21 hours ago
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  •  0  0  15 July, 2019
  • Here's a teaser of the amazing Lake Louisa State Park! Be sure to swing over to the TUBE to catch the whole video! Just search The Hiker Dad & you won't be disappointed 😉
  • Here's a teaser of the amazing Lake Louisa State Park! Be sure to swing over to the TUBE to catch the whole video! Just search The Hiker Dad & you won't be disappointed 😉
  •  61  2  15 July, 2019
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | A Florida panther patrols his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, facing the camera only half the time and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene (those are water drops on the lens port). I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also have seen kittens that were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I get a glimpse into its secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the larger territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that currently target Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me: “The panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words; the panther can help inspire a movement to achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers—and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out the links in my bio. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | A Florida panther patrols his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, facing the camera only half the time and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene (those are water drops on the lens port). I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also have seen kittens that were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I get a glimpse into its secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the larger territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that currently target Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me: “The panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words; the panther can help inspire a movement to achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers—and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out the links in my bio. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo
  •  353,717  821  14 July, 2019
  • Black skimmers have nested at St. Pete beach. How fortunate for us! There are many opportunities to capture everyday black skimmer life. This dad went out and captured this fish to feed it’s juvenile, only to have a laughing gull come by and take the fish from the juvenile moments later.
  • Black skimmers have nested at St. Pete beach. How fortunate for us! There are many opportunities to capture everyday black skimmer life. This dad went out and captured this fish to feed it’s juvenile, only to have a laughing gull come by and take the fish from the juvenile moments later.
  •  64  4  14 July, 2019
  • A juvenile tri-colored heron just relaxing and enjoying the day at Collier-Seminole State Park yesterday.
  • A juvenile tri-colored heron just relaxing and enjoying the day at Collier-Seminole State Park yesterday.
  •  74  7  13 July, 2019
  • From @natgeo 
Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit @carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame. @fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection #beard #beards #bear
  • From @natgeo
    Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit @carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame. @fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection #beard #beards #bear
  •  86  0  13 July, 2019
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  •  8  0  12 July, 2019
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  •  101,506  159  12 July, 2019
  • A fun little family get away to Marco Island for the weekend. Looks like tropical storm Barry is having minimal effect here.
  • A fun little family get away to Marco Island for the weekend. Looks like tropical storm Barry is having minimal effect here.
  •  73  11  12 July, 2019
  • Check out this guy! 👋🏽🐻 #floridawildlifecorridor #Repost @naturally_florida・・・While I set up my DSLR camera traps to capture images of endangered Florida panthers, I get plenty of Florida black bears as well.  Black bears tend to not like cameras setup on their trees.  They push, they grab, they do almost anything to move a camera.  This bear even bit the hardened steel of a Master lock and left sizeable dents on both sides of the lock from his teeth. @bear @floridablackbear @fwc @natgeo
  • Check out this guy! 👋🏽🐻 #floridawildlifecorridor #Repost @naturally_florida・・・While I set up my DSLR camera traps to capture images of endangered Florida panthers, I get plenty of Florida black bears as well. Black bears tend to not like cameras setup on their trees. They push, they grab, they do almost anything to move a camera. This bear even bit the hardened steel of a Master lock and left sizeable dents on both sides of the lock from his teeth. @bear @floridablackbear @fwc @natgeo
  •  1,460  23  11 July, 2019
  • Tri-colored herons are so beautiful when you capture in the right light. This one here was in a shaded area in the Everglades of Florida.
  • Tri-colored herons are so beautiful when you capture in the right light. This one here was in a shaded area in the Everglades of Florida.
  •  132  3  11 July, 2019
  • #Repost @carltonward with @kimcy929_repost
• • • • • •
The Everglades is America’s largest subtropical wilderness and the largest protected stretch of mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere. There are nearly four million acres of contiguous public conservation lands in the Everglades of South Florida, often quite close to cities like Miami, West Palm Beach, Fort Myers and Naples. I captured this photography from a Cessna 177 airplane near Everglades City, which is one of my favorite basecamps for Everglades adventure. Its where Everglades National Park meets Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge and wild lands and waters extend for dozens of miles in every direction. For those who want to immerse in the Everglades, the 99-mile Everglades Wilderness Waterway included marked paddling trails and camping sites that connect through the mangrove fringe from Everglades City to Flamingo (closer to Miami). Everglades National Park has been declared an International Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage Site and a Wetland of International Importance, one of only three locations in the world to appear on all three lists. @VISITFLORIDA #sponsored #LoveFL #Everglades #Mangroves #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild
  • #Repost @carltonward with @kimcy929_repost
    • • • • • •
    The Everglades is America’s largest subtropical wilderness and the largest protected stretch of mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere. There are nearly four million acres of contiguous public conservation lands in the Everglades of South Florida, often quite close to cities like Miami, West Palm Beach, Fort Myers and Naples. I captured this photography from a Cessna 177 airplane near Everglades City, which is one of my favorite basecamps for Everglades adventure. Its where Everglades National Park meets Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge and wild lands and waters extend for dozens of miles in every direction. For those who want to immerse in the Everglades, the 99-mile Everglades Wilderness Waterway included marked paddling trails and camping sites that connect through the mangrove fringe from Everglades City to Flamingo (closer to Miami). Everglades National Park has been declared an International Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage Site and a Wetland of International Importance, one of only three locations in the world to appear on all three lists. @VISITFLORIDA #sponsored #LoveFL #Everglades #Mangroves #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild
  •  63  0  11 July, 2019
  • There are things I miss about Florida, it was my place of birth and for 68 years of my life. Not far from its traffic congestion and concrete you can find places of immense beauty and peace that most who visit the state never experience. This is just a little piece of that tranquillity. Take time to experience and explore the places you visit or live in. You will find life more fulfilling and complete.
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“Who owns the land? It seems to me that the earth may be borrowed, but not bought. It may be used, but not owned. It gives itself in response to love and tending, offers its sesonal flowering and fruiting. But we are tenants and not possessors, lovers, and not masters. It belongs to the wind and the rain, to the sun and the seasons, to the cosmic secrecy of seed, and beyond all, to time.” Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
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#florida #roamfl #wildflorida #marjoriekinnanrawlings #floridawildlifecorridor
  • There are things I miss about Florida, it was my place of birth and for 68 years of my life. Not far from its traffic congestion and concrete you can find places of immense beauty and peace that most who visit the state never experience. This is just a little piece of that tranquillity. Take time to experience and explore the places you visit or live in. You will find life more fulfilling and complete.
    .
    .
    “Who owns the land? It seems to me that the earth may be borrowed, but not bought. It may be used, but not owned. It gives itself in response to love and tending, offers its sesonal flowering and fruiting. But we are tenants and not possessors, lovers, and not masters. It belongs to the wind and the rain, to the sun and the seasons, to the cosmic secrecy of seed, and beyond all, to time.” Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
    .
    .
    #florida #roamfl #wildflorida #marjoriekinnanrawlings #floridawildlifecorridor
  •  93  12  11 July, 2019
  • Posted @withrepost • @carltonward 5 photos >> I was hanging from the side of a pine tree on a cattle ranch ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear when it suddenly stood up, looked around, and then scrambled high into a pine on the other side of the clearing. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. This was 2013. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends Joe Guthrie and Wade Ulrey were hosting a bear workshop at nearby Archbold Biological Station. I was spending each dawn and dusk in my tree stand trying to photograph bears and then joining the workshop during midday. Colleagues were planning the future and implications of the bear research that Joe and Wade had been leading since the tragic loss of their professor Dave Maehr in a plane crash while tracking bears the year before. During this bear workshop is when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor campaign based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network science by Tom Hoctor. In essence, the black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now, more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears and other wildlife. @fl_wildcorridor @joeguthrie8 @archboldstation @wade_ulrey @tom_hoctor_gnv #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers #florida #floridawildlife #wildlifewednesday
  • Posted @withrepost@carltonward 5 photos >> I was hanging from the side of a pine tree on a cattle ranch ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear when it suddenly stood up, looked around, and then scrambled high into a pine on the other side of the clearing. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. This was 2013. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends Joe Guthrie and Wade Ulrey were hosting a bear workshop at nearby Archbold Biological Station. I was spending each dawn and dusk in my tree stand trying to photograph bears and then joining the workshop during midday. Colleagues were planning the future and implications of the bear research that Joe and Wade had been leading since the tragic loss of their professor Dave Maehr in a plane crash while tracking bears the year before. During this bear workshop is when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor campaign based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network science by Tom Hoctor. In essence, the black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now, more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears and other wildlife. @fl_wildcorridor @joeguthrie8 @archboldstation @wade_ulrey @tom_hoctor_gnv #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers #florida #floridawildlife #wildlifewednesday
  •  79  0  10 July, 2019
  • This is an inspirational photo to me. This black skimmer pair is showing each other love while the mom skimmer on the left is sitting on her nest. A whole lot of love in this photo with a beautiful beach background 😍
  • This is an inspirational photo to me. This black skimmer pair is showing each other love while the mom skimmer on the left is sitting on her nest. A whole lot of love in this photo with a beautiful beach background 😍
  •  180  9  10 July, 2019
  • #repost from @natgeo 
Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit @carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame. @fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection
  • #repost from @natgeo
    Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit @carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame. @fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection
  •  80  0  9 July, 2019
  • Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit@carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame.@fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear#FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther#FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers@natgeoimagecollection
  • Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit@carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame.@fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation  #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor  #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild  #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers@natgeoimagecollection
  •  31  0  9 July, 2019

Top #FloridaWildlifeCorridor Posts

  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | A Florida panther patrols his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, facing the camera only half the time and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene (those are water drops on the lens port). I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also have seen kittens that were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I get a glimpse into its secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the larger territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that currently target Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me: “The panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words; the panther can help inspire a movement to achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers—and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out the links in my bio. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | A Florida panther patrols his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, facing the camera only half the time and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene (those are water drops on the lens port). I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also have seen kittens that were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I get a glimpse into its secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the larger territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that currently target Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me: “The panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words; the panther can help inspire a movement to achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers—and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out the links in my bio. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo
  •  353,717  821  14 July, 2019
  • Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit @carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame. @fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection
  • Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | I was hanging from a pine tree on a cattle ranch in Highlands County photographing a young Florida black bear in a clearing below, when it suddenly stood up on its back legs, looked around, and then scrambled high into another pine. Then I saw a much bigger male bear was coming down the trail. The young bear stayed draped over the lowest branch, still higher than my tree stand, and patiently waited for the the big bear to move on. Then the little bear slid down the tree and scurried away. Four years before, I was hanging in another pine on an adjacent ranch when my friends were hosting a "bear workshop" at nearby Archbold Biological Station. This was when we first officially proposed the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, based on bear science and the Florida Ecological Greenways Network. The black bears living on the nearby ranches, and their wide landscape movements illuminated by my friends’ research, showed us how we could save wild Florida. Now more than ever, we need to accelerate the pace of conservation to save the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor for bears, other wildlife and ourselves. Visit @carltonward to see me in my tree stand and a photo the little bear and big bear in the same frame. @fl_wildcorridor @archboldstation #Bear #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection
  •  542,503  1,621  8 July, 2019
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr @carltonward | Summer brings back lifelong memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, diving, fishing, surfing, and tropical storms. The Gulf was my initial connection with wild Florida. These two photos are from edges of the Florida Wildlife Corridor, where Florida's wild interior meets the Gulf coast. The image shows Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola. The beauty of the Gulf's surface hides a darker truth—pollution and development on land threaten its health. The Gulf of Mexico watershed encompasses 31 US States (and parts of Canada), making it downstream from most of the country. #GulfofMexico #FloridaWildlifeCorridor
  •  101,506  159  12 July, 2019
  • Check out this guy! 👋🏽🐻 #floridawildlifecorridor #Repost @naturally_florida・・・While I set up my DSLR camera traps to capture images of endangered Florida panthers, I get plenty of Florida black bears as well.  Black bears tend to not like cameras setup on their trees.  They push, they grab, they do almost anything to move a camera.  This bear even bit the hardened steel of a Master lock and left sizeable dents on both sides of the lock from his teeth. @bear @floridablackbear @fwc @natgeo
  • Check out this guy! 👋🏽🐻 #floridawildlifecorridor #Repost @naturally_florida・・・While I set up my DSLR camera traps to capture images of endangered Florida panthers, I get plenty of Florida black bears as well. Black bears tend to not like cameras setup on their trees. They push, they grab, they do almost anything to move a camera. This bear even bit the hardened steel of a Master lock and left sizeable dents on both sides of the lock from his teeth. @bear @floridablackbear @fwc @natgeo
  •  1,460  23  11 July, 2019
  • I love knowing that this healthy male Florida panther is patrolling his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, only half the time facing the camera and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene. This time there were water drops on the lens port. I still like the photo, knowing it will be another year or more before a similar moment comes again. I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also seen kittens who were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I have a glimpse into the panther’s secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the greater territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that are currently targeting Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words and that the panther can help inspire a movement to save to Florida Wildlife Corridor and achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers — and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out some of the links in my bio, including the sign up for my Path of the Panther newsletter. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther #puma @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo @ilcp_photographers
  • I love knowing that this healthy male Florida panther is patrolling his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, only half the time facing the camera and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene. This time there were water drops on the lens port. I still like the photo, knowing it will be another year or more before a similar moment comes again. I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also seen kittens who were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I have a glimpse into the panther’s secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the greater territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that are currently targeting Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words and that the panther can help inspire a movement to save to Florida Wildlife Corridor and achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers — and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out some of the links in my bio, including the sign up for my Path of the Panther newsletter. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther #puma @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo @ilcp_photographers
  •  5,736  89  5 July, 2019
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | A burrowing owl snacks on a mole cricket on a cattle ranch in the Everglades Headwaters region of the Florida Wildlife Corridor near Orlando. Cattle ranches throughout the Greater Everglades provide crucial wildlife habitat and keep a statewide network of public and private lands connected. This particular ranch is protected by a conservation easement. But most of Florida's agricultural lands are threatened by sprawling development. On average, 1,000 people move to Florida every day. Without more investment in conservation, we will continue to lose more than 100,000 acres of wildlife habitat every year to development. For more glimpses of the hidden wild, please follow @carltonward. #owl #florida #floridawild #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #keepflwild @fl_wildcorridor
  • Photo by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | A burrowing owl snacks on a mole cricket on a cattle ranch in the Everglades Headwaters region of the Florida Wildlife Corridor near Orlando. Cattle ranches throughout the Greater Everglades provide crucial wildlife habitat and keep a statewide network of public and private lands connected. This particular ranch is protected by a conservation easement. But most of Florida's agricultural lands are threatened by sprawling development. On average, 1,000 people move to Florida every day. Without more investment in conservation, we will continue to lose more than 100,000 acres of wildlife habitat every year to development. For more glimpses of the hidden wild, please follow @carltonward. #owl #florida #floridawild #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #keepflwild @fl_wildcorridor
  •  716,209  3,070  29 June, 2019