Carlton Ward Jr ( @carltonward ) Instagram Profile

carltonward

Carlton Ward Jr

@NatGeo Photographer | Current story: How the Florida panther can help save Florida | #PathofthePanther @FL_WildCorridor

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Carlton Ward Jr Profile Information

  • Chasing Ghosts [9 of 9] >>>>>> These are six species of sphinx moths I captured with camera traps last summer probing and potentially pollinating rare ghost orchids in the Fakahatchee Strand. There was previously no evidence of ghost orchid pollination with the species of moth identifiable. These photos debunk the widely held theory that the giant sphinx moth is the sole pollinator. Please follow @macstonephoto for more first-ever photos and groundbreaking research with @peter_houlihan at @corkscrewswamp last summer. And please watch the Chasing Ghosts (link in my bio), a short film about our quest and discoveries! The species of moths in these photos: 1) Eumorpha fasciatus, banded sphinx  2) Pachylia ficus, fig sphinx 3) Agrius cingulata, pink-spotted hawkmoth (likely identification from partial photo) 4) Cocytius antaeus, giant sphinx 5) Manduca rustica, Rustic sphinx (with pollen on its head) 6) Protambulyx strigilis, streaked sphinx. These are from three different ghost orchids all hanging from pop ash trees in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge portion of the Fakahatchee Strand. #chasinghosts #pollination #science #discovery #moth #orchid @ilcp_photographers @insidenatgeo #KeepFLWild
  • Chasing Ghosts [9 of 9] >>>>>> These are six species of sphinx moths I captured with camera traps last summer probing and potentially pollinating rare ghost orchids in the Fakahatchee Strand. There was previously no evidence of ghost orchid pollination with the species of moth identifiable. These photos debunk the widely held theory that the giant sphinx moth is the sole pollinator. Please follow @macstonephoto for more first-ever photos and groundbreaking research with @peter_houlihan at @corkscrewswamp last summer. And please watch the Chasing Ghosts (link in my bio), a short film about our quest and discoveries! The species of moths in these photos: 1) Eumorpha fasciatus, banded sphinx 2) Pachylia ficus, fig sphinx 3) Agrius cingulata, pink-spotted hawkmoth (likely identification from partial photo) 4) Cocytius antaeus, giant sphinx 5) Manduca rustica, Rustic sphinx (with pollen on its head) 6) Protambulyx strigilis, streaked sphinx. These are from three different ghost orchids all hanging from pop ash trees in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge portion of the Fakahatchee Strand. #chasinghosts #pollination #science #discovery #moth #orchid @ilcp_photographers @insidenatgeo #KeepFLWild
  •  3,643  77  15 July, 2019
  • Chasing Ghosts [8 of 9] >>>> One year ago this week, I paddled up to one of my ghost orchid camera traps in Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge and found these photos. My camera had been focused on this same orchid for three subsequent summers, so when I discovered more than a dozen photos of large moths probing the orchid blooms across multiple nights the prior week, my feelings were a combination of excitement and relief — possibly a bit more relief because it made three years of obsession and weekly summer pilgrimages to these swamps somehow feel a little more sane, and because I didn’t think I’d be able to convince myself or my family to try again the following year. Always self critical, I was also frustrated that I hadn’t anticipated that the huge size and weight of the moths could bounce the orchid out of frame. I’d left my composition too tight so that some photos cropped out parts of the moth. Unfortunately that’s how my mind was working, rather than enjoying the moment when I’d captured the first-ever photographs of a ghost orchid being pollinated. Excitement really didn’t set in until I shared photos with biologist Mark Danaher from the Panther Refuge, and Mac Stone and Peter Houlihan. Mark and Peter identified these moths as fig sphinxes Pachylia ficus and explained that this was a big deal because it was not the giant sphinx moth that everyone expected to be the pollinator. They also confirmed that a ghost orchid pollen sack was visible on the head of the moth in the first three photos (the 4th photo is of a female off sphinx probing a bloom on the same orchid a few days later. These photos were also the first evidence for Peter’s hypothesis that the ghost orchid could have multiple pollinators, and immediately led to more questions, such as who else might be pollinating these flowers. @peter_houlihan and @macstonephoto soon made paradigm shifting discoveries of their own at @corkscrewswamp. Please follow them and watch the new short film Chasing Ghosts (link in my bio) to find out more! Thank you @grizzlycreekfilms @biographic_magazine @jeffreedfilm and @bendicci for your phenomenal work! #chasingghosts #KeepFLWild
  • Chasing Ghosts [8 of 9] >>>> One year ago this week, I paddled up to one of my ghost orchid camera traps in Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge and found these photos. My camera had been focused on this same orchid for three subsequent summers, so when I discovered more than a dozen photos of large moths probing the orchid blooms across multiple nights the prior week, my feelings were a combination of excitement and relief — possibly a bit more relief because it made three years of obsession and weekly summer pilgrimages to these swamps somehow feel a little more sane, and because I didn’t think I’d be able to convince myself or my family to try again the following year. Always self critical, I was also frustrated that I hadn’t anticipated that the huge size and weight of the moths could bounce the orchid out of frame. I’d left my composition too tight so that some photos cropped out parts of the moth. Unfortunately that’s how my mind was working, rather than enjoying the moment when I’d captured the first-ever photographs of a ghost orchid being pollinated. Excitement really didn’t set in until I shared photos with biologist Mark Danaher from the Panther Refuge, and Mac Stone and Peter Houlihan. Mark and Peter identified these moths as fig sphinxes Pachylia ficus and explained that this was a big deal because it was not the giant sphinx moth that everyone expected to be the pollinator. They also confirmed that a ghost orchid pollen sack was visible on the head of the moth in the first three photos (the 4th photo is of a female off sphinx probing a bloom on the same orchid a few days later. These photos were also the first evidence for Peter’s hypothesis that the ghost orchid could have multiple pollinators, and immediately led to more questions, such as who else might be pollinating these flowers. @peter_houlihan and @macstonephoto soon made paradigm shifting discoveries of their own at @corkscrewswamp. Please follow them and watch the new short film Chasing Ghosts (link in my bio) to find out more! Thank you @grizzlycreekfilms @biographic_magazine @jeffreedfilm and @bendicci for your phenomenal work! #chasingghosts #KeepFLWild
  •  5,600  162  13 July, 2019
  • Chasing Ghosts [5 of 9] > Ghost orchid blooms. Ephemeral white flowers that sometimes emerge during the summer from rare leafless ghost orchids hanging from trees above water in the deepest corners of South Florida swamps. These flowers, and the magical places where they live, have been the focus of my obsession for the past three years. @macstonephoto @peter_houlihan and I joined forces last summer in our converging quests to try to solve one of the greatest mysteries of the Evergaldes — what pollinates the ghost orchid? Look at the bloom on the left and take note of the long the tubelike structure dangling down and right from the back of the flower. This is the nectar spur. It contains the sweet liquid that lures a moth to bury its head into the flower cup and reach its tongue called a proboscis as deep as possible into the spur to reach the most nectar. The ghost orchid nectar spur is long, suggesting that the the moth species that pollinates it would have a proboscis that is equally long. The giant sphinx moth has the longest proboscis is all South Florida moths leading to the widely held theory that it is the sole pollinator of the ghost orchid. But there is no visual evidence to validate this claim. Using camera traps and lots of patience, we set out to try and capture the first-ever photographs of pollination. What species of creatures are we to keep coming back to these orchids summer after summer? This is a question for another time and place. Whether a rare or common species, I know I’m not alone in being enchanted and possibly controlled by these mesmerizing flowers that embody so much history, controversy, mystique and undeniable splendor of Florida at its wildest heart. Please continue to follow this journey as it unfolds in the coming days. #chasingghosts #pathofthepanther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo @natgeoimagecollection @ilcp_photographers #floridawild #KeepFLWild #ghostorchid
  • Chasing Ghosts [5 of 9] > Ghost orchid blooms. Ephemeral white flowers that sometimes emerge during the summer from rare leafless ghost orchids hanging from trees above water in the deepest corners of South Florida swamps. These flowers, and the magical places where they live, have been the focus of my obsession for the past three years. @macstonephoto @peter_houlihan and I joined forces last summer in our converging quests to try to solve one of the greatest mysteries of the Evergaldes — what pollinates the ghost orchid? Look at the bloom on the left and take note of the long the tubelike structure dangling down and right from the back of the flower. This is the nectar spur. It contains the sweet liquid that lures a moth to bury its head into the flower cup and reach its tongue called a proboscis as deep as possible into the spur to reach the most nectar. The ghost orchid nectar spur is long, suggesting that the the moth species that pollinates it would have a proboscis that is equally long. The giant sphinx moth has the longest proboscis is all South Florida moths leading to the widely held theory that it is the sole pollinator of the ghost orchid. But there is no visual evidence to validate this claim. Using camera traps and lots of patience, we set out to try and capture the first-ever photographs of pollination. What species of creatures are we to keep coming back to these orchids summer after summer? This is a question for another time and place. Whether a rare or common species, I know I’m not alone in being enchanted and possibly controlled by these mesmerizing flowers that embody so much history, controversy, mystique and undeniable splendor of Florida at its wildest heart. Please continue to follow this journey as it unfolds in the coming days. #chasingghosts #pathofthepanther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo @natgeoimagecollection @ilcp_photographers #floridawild #KeepFLWild #ghostorchid
  •  4,246  43  11 July, 2019
  • Chasing Ghosts [4 of 9] >> While I was paddling deep into the Fakahatchee (previous post), @macstonephoto and @peter_houlihan were climbing high into cypress trees at @corkscrewswamp, all of us seeking the answer to the same question. Like me, Peter and Mac are both National Geographic Explorers. Peter has received National Geographic grants for his research on orchid pollination, including years or ghost orchid monitoring in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park. Mac just received s prestigious National Geographic storytelling grant for his work documenting the last old growth swamps of the American South. Old growth means original forest that has never been cut down — extremely rare for cypress, or any trees really. Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary near Naples protects the largest old growth cypress forest remaining in North America. There are two known ghost orchids surviving at Corkscrew, both living high in old growth cypress trees. Corkscrew’s most famous attraction is called the Super Ghost because it is huge orchid that produces as many as a dozen blooms at once; and more than 40 blooms in some years. By comparison, the most blooms I’ve seen on a ghost in the Fakahatchee is three at once and five during a year. Mac designed his camera trap to for the super ghost, which required him to climb on a rope 50 feet up into the orchid’s old growth cypress host to deploy a camera trap system that could be suspended safely from the tree. See @macstonephoto for more. In the first photo, which I captured with a drone, Mac (white helmet) and Peter are configuring their super ghost camera trap. The second photo, also from a drone, shows Peter using a white sheet and a blacklight to attract and sample insects 90 feet up in the old growth canopy. While light trapping last summer, one moth species they attracted was a giant sphinx. Please stay tuned for more of the journey. #chasinghosts #oldgrowrh #cypress #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubon_fl @fl_wildcorridor
  • Chasing Ghosts [4 of 9] >> While I was paddling deep into the Fakahatchee (previous post), @macstonephoto and @peter_houlihan were climbing high into cypress trees at @corkscrewswamp, all of us seeking the answer to the same question. Like me, Peter and Mac are both National Geographic Explorers. Peter has received National Geographic grants for his research on orchid pollination, including years or ghost orchid monitoring in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park. Mac just received s prestigious National Geographic storytelling grant for his work documenting the last old growth swamps of the American South. Old growth means original forest that has never been cut down — extremely rare for cypress, or any trees really. Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary near Naples protects the largest old growth cypress forest remaining in North America. There are two known ghost orchids surviving at Corkscrew, both living high in old growth cypress trees. Corkscrew’s most famous attraction is called the Super Ghost because it is huge orchid that produces as many as a dozen blooms at once; and more than 40 blooms in some years. By comparison, the most blooms I’ve seen on a ghost in the Fakahatchee is three at once and five during a year. Mac designed his camera trap to for the super ghost, which required him to climb on a rope 50 feet up into the orchid’s old growth cypress host to deploy a camera trap system that could be suspended safely from the tree. See @macstonephoto for more. In the first photo, which I captured with a drone, Mac (white helmet) and Peter are configuring their super ghost camera trap. The second photo, also from a drone, shows Peter using a white sheet and a blacklight to attract and sample insects 90 feet up in the old growth canopy. While light trapping last summer, one moth species they attracted was a giant sphinx. Please stay tuned for more of the journey. #chasinghosts #oldgrowrh #cypress #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubon_fl @fl_wildcorridor
  •  2,274  27  11 July, 2019
  • Chasing Ghosts [3 of 9] >> I tried again during summer 2017. Most of my camera traps were busy monitoring panther trails ranging from Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge to Babcock Ranch. But I set aside one camera trap to paddle back out into my favorite swamp and focus on ghost orchid blooms hanging low from a pop ash tree with a forest of cypress knees rising from the water in the background. I managed to capture one series of photos of a little green moth visiting one of the flowers (will share in a future post). It was far too small to be a pollinator, but it did prove that my technique was working — that a laser trigger aimed precisely above the lip of a flower could capture the fleeting movements of an insect. The ghost orchid blooms only lasted a couple weeks and no other moths came. But I had seen the potential for success. When I came back in the summer of 2018, I was armed with three camera trap systems hoping to improve my odds. Hurricane Irma had devastated South Florida in September 2017, snapping limbs and trees throughout the Fakahatchee. But Irma also brought record rainfall, which I believe the swamps enjoyed. When I paddled out for the first time the following summer, I noticed more light shining through the wind-shaken canopy, but was relieved that my favorite ghost orchids were thriving. I glided through lanes of cypress and beneath twisted arches of pond apples and pop ashes, excited to continue my summer ritual and motivated to complete my mission. At the same time, @macstonephoto @peter_houlihan began a parallel quest to test Mac’s original idea from four years before and try to photograph ghost orchid pollination. They chose a site high in the old growth cypress at @corkscrewswamp and we joined forces in our quests to illuminate the mystery. Stay tuned to my next post for photos of Peter and Mac at work. The second photo here shows me paddling away from a swamp camp we set later in the season. #chasingghosts #pathofthepanther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @yoloboard @warbonnetoutdoors
  • Chasing Ghosts [3 of 9] >> I tried again during summer 2017. Most of my camera traps were busy monitoring panther trails ranging from Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge to Babcock Ranch. But I set aside one camera trap to paddle back out into my favorite swamp and focus on ghost orchid blooms hanging low from a pop ash tree with a forest of cypress knees rising from the water in the background. I managed to capture one series of photos of a little green moth visiting one of the flowers (will share in a future post). It was far too small to be a pollinator, but it did prove that my technique was working — that a laser trigger aimed precisely above the lip of a flower could capture the fleeting movements of an insect. The ghost orchid blooms only lasted a couple weeks and no other moths came. But I had seen the potential for success. When I came back in the summer of 2018, I was armed with three camera trap systems hoping to improve my odds. Hurricane Irma had devastated South Florida in September 2017, snapping limbs and trees throughout the Fakahatchee. But Irma also brought record rainfall, which I believe the swamps enjoyed. When I paddled out for the first time the following summer, I noticed more light shining through the wind-shaken canopy, but was relieved that my favorite ghost orchids were thriving. I glided through lanes of cypress and beneath twisted arches of pond apples and pop ashes, excited to continue my summer ritual and motivated to complete my mission. At the same time, @macstonephoto @peter_houlihan began a parallel quest to test Mac’s original idea from four years before and try to photograph ghost orchid pollination. They chose a site high in the old growth cypress at @corkscrewswamp and we joined forces in our quests to illuminate the mystery. Stay tuned to my next post for photos of Peter and Mac at work. The second photo here shows me paddling away from a swamp camp we set later in the season. #chasingghosts #pathofthepanther @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @yoloboard @warbonnetoutdoors
  •  2,765  42  11 July, 2019
  • Chasing Ghosts [2 of 9] >>> My life has been shaped by these three ghost orchids during the past three years. Each of these three photos was made from a camera trap, but instead of the laser trigger taking the photo, I pressed the shutter myself to capture moments of twilight and weather in the swamp. The seemingly impossible task of camera trapping a moth pollinating an orchid gave me an excuse to revisit these orchids over and over, and I developed strong connections to their homes in the swamp. The process was therapeutic for me. During the previous three years, the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expeditions had given me a phenomenal opportunity to trek more than 2,000 miles through Florida’s wildest places. But we always kept moving, rarely camping in the same place for more than one night. After the 2015 expedition, I had a disticnt longing to go deeper into places. The Path of the Panther project gave me that chance. And my ghost orchid distraction pulled me even deeper into a single place — the Fakahatchee Strand — a stronghold for the last puma in the east and the highest diversity or orchids in America. It’s an enchanted place that still holds many mysteries waiting to be discovered. My camera traps gave me a portal into this world and an excuse to explore it. I can close my eyes now and see every detail of the paddling trail leading me into these magical swamps thanks to repeating the journey dozens of times in every kind of weather and light.  #Fakahatchee #Everglades #ghostorchid #chasingghosts #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @FL_WildCorridor @insidenatgeo
  • Chasing Ghosts [2 of 9] >>> My life has been shaped by these three ghost orchids during the past three years. Each of these three photos was made from a camera trap, but instead of the laser trigger taking the photo, I pressed the shutter myself to capture moments of twilight and weather in the swamp. The seemingly impossible task of camera trapping a moth pollinating an orchid gave me an excuse to revisit these orchids over and over, and I developed strong connections to their homes in the swamp. The process was therapeutic for me. During the previous three years, the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expeditions had given me a phenomenal opportunity to trek more than 2,000 miles through Florida’s wildest places. But we always kept moving, rarely camping in the same place for more than one night. After the 2015 expedition, I had a disticnt longing to go deeper into places. The Path of the Panther project gave me that chance. And my ghost orchid distraction pulled me even deeper into a single place — the Fakahatchee Strand — a stronghold for the last puma in the east and the highest diversity or orchids in America. It’s an enchanted place that still holds many mysteries waiting to be discovered. My camera traps gave me a portal into this world and an excuse to explore it. I can close my eyes now and see every detail of the paddling trail leading me into these magical swamps thanks to repeating the journey dozens of times in every kind of weather and light. #Fakahatchee #Everglades #ghostorchid #chasingghosts #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @FL_WildCorridor @insidenatgeo
  •  5,696  108  10 July, 2019
  • Chasing Ghosts [1 of 9] Here is the first of a short series about a distraction that became an obsession over the past three years. In summer of 2016, I moved my Airstream trailer to Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge to begin my Path of the Panther project with National Geographic. I had four dSLR camera traps on loan from NG and started building four more of my own. My purpose was to capture evocative photos of the elusive Florida panther; to tell its story as an emblem of the Florida Wildlife Corridor and need to protect this lifeline of habitat connecting public lands is the Everglades north through the Florida peninsula. Panthers were my priority but then I got distracted. I met a team of scientists and students living in the trailer across from mine who were in the second year of new project surveying and monitoring ghost orchids across the Refuge (these teams have now documented 500 mostly undiscovered ghost orchids). And one of the biologists was trying to get the first-ever photo of a ghost orchid being pollinated using an off-the-shelf trail camera. They took me out to a remote pond in the Headwaters of the Fakahatchee Strand to see their camera site. I knew their camera wouldn’t be fast enough to capture a flying moth but I happened to have a dSLR camera trap and new precision laser trigger at camp. That’s when my obsessions took hold. My friend @macstonephoto had proposed the idea of camera trapping ghost orchid pollination back in 2014 but I got the first chance to try. I was certainly motivated to help solve the mystery of ghost orchid pollination but even more so I was drawn the swamp. Checking on my ghost orchid camera gave me a weekly ritual of driving my UTV intro the Fakahatchee until the water got too deep and then paddling a couple miles further into darkly shaded pond apple and pop ash sloughs. This journey, as often as every few days, was my escape from grind of wires, chop saws and soldering irons in the oppressive heat that went along with camera trapping panthers on dry land. I got no moth photos the first summer, which gave me an excuse to try again the next year. Pics 1 & 3 FPNWR biologist Mark Danaher. To be continued...
  • Chasing Ghosts [1 of 9] Here is the first of a short series about a distraction that became an obsession over the past three years. In summer of 2016, I moved my Airstream trailer to Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge to begin my Path of the Panther project with National Geographic. I had four dSLR camera traps on loan from NG and started building four more of my own. My purpose was to capture evocative photos of the elusive Florida panther; to tell its story as an emblem of the Florida Wildlife Corridor and need to protect this lifeline of habitat connecting public lands is the Everglades north through the Florida peninsula. Panthers were my priority but then I got distracted. I met a team of scientists and students living in the trailer across from mine who were in the second year of new project surveying and monitoring ghost orchids across the Refuge (these teams have now documented 500 mostly undiscovered ghost orchids). And one of the biologists was trying to get the first-ever photo of a ghost orchid being pollinated using an off-the-shelf trail camera. They took me out to a remote pond in the Headwaters of the Fakahatchee Strand to see their camera site. I knew their camera wouldn’t be fast enough to capture a flying moth but I happened to have a dSLR camera trap and new precision laser trigger at camp. That’s when my obsessions took hold. My friend @macstonephoto had proposed the idea of camera trapping ghost orchid pollination back in 2014 but I got the first chance to try. I was certainly motivated to help solve the mystery of ghost orchid pollination but even more so I was drawn the swamp. Checking on my ghost orchid camera gave me a weekly ritual of driving my UTV intro the Fakahatchee until the water got too deep and then paddling a couple miles further into darkly shaded pond apple and pop ash sloughs. This journey, as often as every few days, was my escape from grind of wires, chop saws and soldering irons in the oppressive heat that went along with camera trapping panthers on dry land. I got no moth photos the first summer, which gave me an excuse to try again the next year. Pics 1 & 3 FPNWR biologist Mark Danaher. To be continued...
  •  5,330  87  9 July, 2019
  • I love knowing that this healthy male Florida panther is patrolling his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, only half the time facing the camera and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene. This time there were water drops on the lens port. I still like the photo, knowing it will be another year or more before a similar moment comes again. I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also seen kittens who were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I have a glimpse into the panther’s secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the greater territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that are currently targeting Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words and that the panther can help inspire a movement to save to Florida Wildlife Corridor and achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers — and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out some of the links in my bio, including the sign up for my Path of the Panther newsletter. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther #puma @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo @ilcp_photographers
  • I love knowing that this healthy male Florida panther is patrolling his territory in the cypress swamps and pine woods of southwest Florida. He walks through this camera trap at Babcock Ranch about once a month, only half the time facing the camera and mostly at night. Once or twice a year I get to see him like this, with some daylight adding depth to the scene. This time there were water drops on the lens port. I still like the photo, knowing it will be another year or more before a similar moment comes again. I’ve known this panther, through my camera traps, for nearly three years. I’ve seen him heal from battle scars, recover from a limp, and persistently court the first female panther documented north of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. I also seen kittens who were probably his. I’ve never seen a panther in this part of Florida with my own eyes. Only through tracks and photos do I have a glimpse into the panther’s secretive life. Knowing this dominant male panther is patrolling and defending his territory gives me hope that we can use his story to defend the greater territory of his species from the expanded roads and development that are currently targeting Florida’s last wild places. Rancher Cary Lightsey told me “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” I believe his words and that the panther can help inspire a movement to save to Florida Wildlife Corridor and achieve balance for wild Florida and ourselves. I’m going to keep photographing and filming panthers — and the land they represent. And we’re going to use the story to promote new conservation policies that empower landowners seeking alternatives to development. Please stay connected with me in the coming months and check out some of the links in my bio, including the sign up for my Path of the Panther newsletter. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor #pathofthepanther #floridawild #KeepFLWild #panther #puma @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo @ilcp_photographers
  •  5,736  89  5 July, 2019
  • July 4th brings back memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, boats and fireworks. These two photos of the Gulf are from edges of then Florida Wildlife Corridor in the FL panhandle. The first Santa Rosa Beach. The second Gulf Islands National Seashore. This afternoon i’m headed to my childhood home of Clearwater to get back out on the water! #FloridaWild
  • July 4th brings back memories of the Gulf of Mexico. Long days with family and friends, boats and fireworks. These two photos of the Gulf are from edges of then Florida Wildlife Corridor in the FL panhandle. The first Santa Rosa Beach. The second Gulf Islands National Seashore. This afternoon i’m headed to my childhood home of Clearwater to get back out on the water! #FloridaWild
  •  3,506  41  4 July, 2019
  • Swipe for panoramic >> Now that it’s July, we’re entering the peek of cattle season in Florida. Ranchers from across the state will be gathering their herds for the annual sale of calves. I’m looking forward to getting back out there, including a week with the Seminole Tribe mid month. In addition to being one of the top producers of cattle in America, the Seminoles also raise quarter horses. I’ll never forget this morning a few years back at the Brighton Reservation when this train of horses came thundering out of the fog and then disappeared. @fl_wildcorridor @carltonwardgallery @natgeoimagecollection #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #horses
  • Swipe for panoramic >> Now that it’s July, we’re entering the peek of cattle season in Florida. Ranchers from across the state will be gathering their herds for the annual sale of calves. I’m looking forward to getting back out there, including a week with the Seminole Tribe mid month. In addition to being one of the top producers of cattle in America, the Seminoles also raise quarter horses. I’ll never forget this morning a few years back at the Brighton Reservation when this train of horses came thundering out of the fog and then disappeared. @fl_wildcorridor @carltonwardgallery @natgeoimagecollection #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #horses
  •  7,835  104  2 July, 2019