Everyday Climate Change ( @everydayclimatechange ) Instagram Profile

everydayclimatechange

Everyday Climate Change

Climate change is real. A diverse group of photographers from 6 continents document climate change. Share your photos with #everydayclimatechange.

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  • Image by @sean_gallagher_photo Just offshore one of Tuvalu's beaches, a piece of machinery has stood against the waves for more than 70 years. It is a piece of machinery left by American forces during their stationing on Tuvalu during World War 2. The island nation was a key position in the Pacific theatre and was home to some 6000 American troops who launched aerial raids against Japanese forces further north. Now, the rusting remains of equipment can occasionally be found on the islands, still standing where they were left seven deacdes previous. Vakai Tui, 24, stands near one of these pieces of equipment near a beach on the main island of Fongafale. ••• The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only a few  metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise.••• #pacific #pacificislands #polynesia #tuvalu #funafuti #climatechange #ww2 #worldwar2 #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange
  • Image by @sean_gallagher_photo Just offshore one of Tuvalu's beaches, a piece of machinery has stood against the waves for more than 70 years. It is a piece of machinery left by American forces during their stationing on Tuvalu during World War 2. The island nation was a key position in the Pacific theatre and was home to some 6000 American troops who launched aerial raids against Japanese forces further north. Now, the rusting remains of equipment can occasionally be found on the islands, still standing where they were left seven deacdes previous. Vakai Tui, 24, stands near one of these pieces of equipment near a beach on the main island of Fongafale. ••• The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only a few metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise.••• #pacific #pacificislands #polynesia #tuvalu #funafuti #climatechange #ww2 #worldwar2 #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange
  •  542  1  12 July, 2019
  • “Children relieve themselves from the heat at a public fountain in Rome”

Summer temperature records are already being broken. Data shows that the European-average temperature for June 2019 was higher than for any other June on record. Average temperatures were more than 2°C above normal and it has become the hottest June ever recorded. Although not as persistent as that of summer 2018, this heat wave, caused by a mass of hot air coming from the Sahara Desert, was intense. The five days of unusually high temperatures followed days with record-breaking temperatures further east in Europe. This led to the month as a whole being around 1°C above the previous record for June, set in 1999, and about 1°C higher than expected from the trend in recent decades. Data provided by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), implemented by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts on behalf of the European Union, show that the global-average temperature for June 2019 was also the highest on record for the month. Although it is difficult to directly attribute this heat wave to climate change, such extreme weather events are expected to become more common as the planet continues to warm under increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Looking at the temperature data from a longer-term perspective reveals the month to be even more unusual. Merging the latest C3S data with datasets that extend further back in time shows that the June 2019 European-average temperature was more than 3°C higher than the average for 1850-1900.

Photo by @paolopatrizi for @everydayclimatechange

#everydayclimatechange #ECC #actionclimate #climatechangeisreal #climatechange #heatwawe #recordbreakingtemperatures
  • “Children relieve themselves from the heat at a public fountain in Rome”

    Summer temperature records are already being broken. Data shows that the European-average temperature for June 2019 was higher than for any other June on record. Average temperatures were more than 2°C above normal and it has become the hottest June ever recorded. Although not as persistent as that of summer 2018, this heat wave, caused by a mass of hot air coming from the Sahara Desert, was intense. The five days of unusually high temperatures followed days with record-breaking temperatures further east in Europe. This led to the month as a whole being around 1°C above the previous record for June, set in 1999, and about 1°C higher than expected from the trend in recent decades. Data provided by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), implemented by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts on behalf of the European Union, show that the global-average temperature for June 2019 was also the highest on record for the month. Although it is difficult to directly attribute this heat wave to climate change, such extreme weather events are expected to become more common as the planet continues to warm under increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Looking at the temperature data from a longer-term perspective reveals the month to be even more unusual. Merging the latest C3S data with datasets that extend further back in time shows that the June 2019 European-average temperature was more than 3°C higher than the average for 1850-1900.

    Photo by @paolopatrizi for @everydayclimatechange

    #everydayclimatechange #ECC #actionclimate #climatechangeisreal #climatechange #heatwawe #recordbreakingtemperatures
  •  611  0  10 July, 2019
  • Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange .

Amazon, Brazil 🇧🇷, July 2019 .

Brazil is home to 60% of the Amazon, the largest rainforest in the world, seen as vital to the global fight against climate change.  Amazonia lost 18% of the forest area between 1985 and 2017. With the far-right government of Jair Bolsonaro, deforestation has advanced significantly in recent months.  In June 2019, the biggest losses occurred since the beginning of the mapping of the forest. .

#everydayclimatechange #climatechange #cliamtecrisis #amazon #stressnexus #rainforest
  • Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange .

    Amazon, Brazil 🇧🇷, July 2019 .

    Brazil is home to 60% of the Amazon, the largest rainforest in the world, seen as vital to the global fight against climate change. Amazonia lost 18% of the forest area between 1985 and 2017. With the far-right government of Jair Bolsonaro, deforestation has advanced significantly in recent months. In June 2019, the biggest losses occurred since the beginning of the mapping of the forest. .

    #everydayclimatechange #climatechange #cliamtecrisis #amazon #stressnexus #rainforest
  •  646  15  9 July, 2019
  • Image by @sean_gallagher_photo Life revolves around the ocean in Tuvalu. This is somewhat inevitable when the country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The world's smallest country has been identified as one of the most vulnerable nations to climate change. With an average elevation of only a few metres above sea level, it is uniquely vulnerable to sea level rise changes. ••• In this image, a boy is seen (centre-right) from above as he rides a wave that is travelling in from the Pacific Ocean onto the Tuvaluan coastline. I saw this boy playing in the breaking waves and decided to fly a drone above him to get this unique perspective. ••• #pacific #pacificislands #tuvalu #climatechange #dji #djimavicpro2 #surfing #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange @natgeoimagecollection
  • Image by @sean_gallagher_photo Life revolves around the ocean in Tuvalu. This is somewhat inevitable when the country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The world's smallest country has been identified as one of the most vulnerable nations to climate change. With an average elevation of only a few metres above sea level, it is uniquely vulnerable to sea level rise changes. ••• In this image, a boy is seen (centre-right) from above as he rides a wave that is travelling in from the Pacific Ocean onto the Tuvaluan coastline. I saw this boy playing in the breaking waves and decided to fly a drone above him to get this unique perspective. ••• #pacific #pacificislands #tuvalu #climatechange #dji #djimavicpro2 #surfing #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange @natgeoimagecollection
  •  863  5  6 July, 2019
  • Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange .

Amazon, Brazil 🇧🇷 .

Yesterday I flew over part of the Amazon and saw how the current Brazilian government is against environmental policies.  The National Institute of Space Research detected an increase of 88% in Amazon deforestation comparing June 2019 to June 2018. Since the beginning of the extreme right-wing government of President Jair Bolsonaro, there is an expansion of economic activities in the region that clear the forest for  mining, agricultural expansion and livestock. #everydayclimatechange #climatecrisis #brazil #amazon #rainforest #stressnexus #leicam10
  • Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange .

    Amazon, Brazil 🇧🇷 .

    Yesterday I flew over part of the Amazon and saw how the current Brazilian government is against environmental policies. The National Institute of Space Research detected an increase of 88% in Amazon deforestation comparing June 2019 to June 2018. Since the beginning of the extreme right-wing government of President Jair Bolsonaro, there is an expansion of economic activities in the region that clear the forest for mining, agricultural expansion and livestock. #everydayclimatechange #climatecrisis #brazil #amazon #rainforest #stressnexus #leicam10
  •  716  9  5 July, 2019
  • Photo by Amnon Gutman @gutmanen for #everydayclimatechange. A view of frozen river in E. Ukraine, during a cold winter day.
In the Carpathian Region (encompassing Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Romania and Serbia), heat wave events have become more frequent, longer, more severe and intense over the period 1961 - 2010, in particular in summer in the Hungarian Plain and in Southern Romania. Cold wave frequency, average duration, severity, and intensity over this period, on the other hand, generally decreased in every season except autumn. In this study, a heat wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily maximum temperature above the long-term 90th percentile of daily maximum temperatures. Similarly, a cold wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily minimum temperatures below the long-term 10th percentile of daily minimum temperatures. The trend analysis shows a general tendency to more frequent, longer, more severe and more intense heat wave events in every season in the entire Carpathian Region. On the other hand, the cold waves show a general tendency to less frequent, shorter, less severe, and less intense events.
During 1951-2011, most of the heat wave episodes in Ukraine occurred at stations located in Eastern Ukraine (in this case heat waves being defined as periods of more than 5 consecutive days with daily maximum air temperature ≥5 °C above the mean daily maximum air temperature during June to August for the normal climatic period 1961–1990). The number of heat wave episodes was highest for almost all stations in the decade 2001–2010. For many stations, the longest heat wave duration occurred in the first two decades of August 2010, i.e. in the period of the extremely severe heat wave in Western Russia. #climatechange #globalwarming#climatechangeukraine
  • Photo by Amnon Gutman @gutmanen for #everydayclimatechange. A view of frozen river in E. Ukraine, during a cold winter day.
    In the Carpathian Region (encompassing Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Romania and Serbia), heat wave events have become more frequent, longer, more severe and intense over the period 1961 - 2010, in particular in summer in the Hungarian Plain and in Southern Romania. Cold wave frequency, average duration, severity, and intensity over this period, on the other hand, generally decreased in every season except autumn. In this study, a heat wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily maximum temperature above the long-term 90th percentile of daily maximum temperatures. Similarly, a cold wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily minimum temperatures below the long-term 10th percentile of daily minimum temperatures. The trend analysis shows a general tendency to more frequent, longer, more severe and more intense heat wave events in every season in the entire Carpathian Region. On the other hand, the cold waves show a general tendency to less frequent, shorter, less severe, and less intense events.
    During 1951-2011, most of the heat wave episodes in Ukraine occurred at stations located in Eastern Ukraine (in this case heat waves being defined as periods of more than 5 consecutive days with daily maximum air temperature ≥5 °C above the mean daily maximum air temperature during June to August for the normal climatic period 1961–1990). The number of heat wave episodes was highest for almost all stations in the decade 2001–2010. For many stations, the longest heat wave duration occurred in the first two decades of August 2010, i.e. in the period of the extremely severe heat wave in Western Russia. #climatechange #globalwarming #climatechangeukraine
  •  345  1  5 July, 2019