Mark Robberds ( @markrobberds ) Instagram Profile

markrobberds

Mark Robberds

FRCms | Kinstretch
Certified Ashtanga Yoga Teacher
Handbalancer
Ido Portal Online Student
Nov 3-29 Goa

  • 2.3k posts
  • 114.5k followers
  • 768 following

Mark Robberds Profile Information

  • Do you experience wrist pain during your asana/vinyasa practice? Here are a few tools that I’ve been sharing with my students and it has been helping a lot. 1️⃣ Use parallettes as a way to both minimise wrist extension (while the injury heals) and to develop more grip strength. The added bonus is you’ll be have the ape 🦍 factor advantage and be able to work on full ROM jump backs and jump throughs - maybe even with straight legs as I show in video 3. 2️⃣ Use handbalancing blocks or yoga blocks so that you can stabilise the wrist joint by gripping with the fingers - activating the wrist and forearm flexors. 3️⃣Passive Range Holds for wrist extension - Use the opposite hand to go into passive wrist extension and then slowly let go and try to hold the position. All the stuff on your forearm that you feel active here is needed to increase the mobility of your wrist. 4️⃣PAILs and RAILs for wrist extension. For PAILs find an opening angle stretch on your forearm (the opposite side to what you just felt) and then try to push out of the stretch by pressing down with your fingers as if you were trying to make a fist. The RAILs effort would be to attempt to pull the top of the hand towards the forearm - feeling all the stuff that you felt with the Passive Range Hold activate. Then add in another Passive Range Hold by maintaining that contraction and leaning forward until you can lift the fingers and front of the hand off the floor.
  • Do you experience wrist pain during your asana/vinyasa practice? Here are a few tools that I’ve been sharing with my students and it has been helping a lot. 1️⃣ Use parallettes as a way to both minimise wrist extension (while the injury heals) and to develop more grip strength. The added bonus is you’ll be have the ape 🦍 factor advantage and be able to work on full ROM jump backs and jump throughs - maybe even with straight legs as I show in video 3. 2️⃣ Use handbalancing blocks or yoga blocks so that you can stabilise the wrist joint by gripping with the fingers - activating the wrist and forearm flexors. 3️⃣Passive Range Holds for wrist extension - Use the opposite hand to go into passive wrist extension and then slowly let go and try to hold the position. All the stuff on your forearm that you feel active here is needed to increase the mobility of your wrist. 4️⃣PAILs and RAILs for wrist extension. For PAILs find an opening angle stretch on your forearm (the opposite side to what you just felt) and then try to push out of the stretch by pressing down with your fingers as if you were trying to make a fist. The RAILs effort would be to attempt to pull the top of the hand towards the forearm - feeling all the stuff that you felt with the Passive Range Hold activate. Then add in another Passive Range Hold by maintaining that contraction and leaning forward until you can lift the fingers and front of the hand off the floor.
  •  2,859  91  9 July, 2019
  • Happy International Handstand Day - surfing 🏄‍♂️ yoga 🧘‍♂️ and handstand 🤸‍♂️ days all in a row lately.... It has been a while since I posted about my handbalancing practice. I’m still at it. Still loving it. Learning all sorts of life lessons from it. Here’s a short clip of some of the positions I’ve been working on. 🙌🏼
  • Happy International Handstand Day - surfing 🏄‍♂️ yoga 🧘‍♂️ and handstand 🤸‍♂️ days all in a row lately.... It has been a while since I posted about my handbalancing practice. I’m still at it. Still loving it. Learning all sorts of life lessons from it. Here’s a short clip of some of the positions I’ve been working on. 🙌🏼
  •  1,534  39  30 June, 2019
  • I’m loving these additions to my shoulder flexion mobility tool-kit 🛠 from the last @coachzachdeck online course. Healthy joints make difficult movements easier - and I literally did these three exercises and tested it by going straight into a handstand pike hollowback and a wheel (swipe left).
It’s important to remember that these are not a quick fix: along with my foundation of yoga practice I’ve been working consistently with the FRC approach for coming up to two years now. We can’t mimic people and learn just from watching IG videos - so I recommend you do the whole course (Link in my bio ☝️). That being said these might be helpful for some of you. 
1️⃣Shoulder Flexion PAILs holding the stick: - keep the ribs ‘down’ (like a hollowbody position), and drive the stick down into the floor. 2️⃣RAILs effort: attempt to lift the stick up off the floor (without rotation of the torso). If it’s too easy walk the hand higher up. 3️⃣Prone Shoulder Flexion PAILs and RAILs - repeat the above principles but this time lying face down and first drive the stick down into the blocks, and then attempt to lift the stick up off the blocks. Maintain a posterior pelvic tilt and keep the ribs down throughout. 4️⃣Shoulder Flexion Hover Challenge.... maintaining a posterior pelvic tilt and ribs down (like in a handstand) lift the arms over a target - like yoga blocks- from the letter Y position to arms in close to the ears - reverse 🔄 and repeat. ✌🏼
  • I’m loving these additions to my shoulder flexion mobility tool-kit 🛠 from the last @coachzachdeck online course. Healthy joints make difficult movements easier - and I literally did these three exercises and tested it by going straight into a handstand pike hollowback and a wheel (swipe left).
    It’s important to remember that these are not a quick fix: along with my foundation of yoga practice I’ve been working consistently with the FRC approach for coming up to two years now. We can’t mimic people and learn just from watching IG videos - so I recommend you do the whole course (Link in my bio ☝️). That being said these might be helpful for some of you.
    1️⃣Shoulder Flexion PAILs holding the stick: - keep the ribs ‘down’ (like a hollowbody position), and drive the stick down into the floor. 2️⃣RAILs effort: attempt to lift the stick up off the floor (without rotation of the torso). If it’s too easy walk the hand higher up. 3️⃣Prone Shoulder Flexion PAILs and RAILs - repeat the above principles but this time lying face down and first drive the stick down into the blocks, and then attempt to lift the stick up off the blocks. Maintain a posterior pelvic tilt and keep the ribs down throughout. 4️⃣Shoulder Flexion Hover Challenge.... maintaining a posterior pelvic tilt and ribs down (like in a handstand) lift the arms over a target - like yoga blocks- from the letter Y position to arms in close to the ears - reverse 🔄 and repeat. ✌🏼
  •  2,003  41  27 June, 2019
  • Happy #internationalyogaday I am forever grateful to this practice, to India, to my teachers: for showing me this way of living, and for bringing my wife @deepikamehtayoga into my life. However, I find it difficult to apologise for the colour of my skin and for my gender. Maybe this is a blind spot that I need to uncover. Some people may even say that marrying an Indian is another form of colonialism, and that teaching Indians as I have done, is another. 
There are many issues rising to the surface now which reflect a wider polarity occurring in society. On the one hand we are seeing the harm and abuse caused by men in the name of ‘Yoga’ exposed, and many are rightly calling for the patriarchal, hierarchical structure to be dismantled. On the other hand there are those who want to defend the tradition that allowed this to happen. Many of my friends have stopped teaching Yoga now because of the hypocrisy. It is reminding me of the way religion has been interpreted throughout history: where people have killed each other in the name of peace and love. 
One of the big problems is that no one can actually define what Yoga is. The way a woman in Saudi Arabia practices is going to be different from someone in Delhi or Los Angeles.... but then again what do I know ? I will be told that I’m just whitewashing and mansplaining. There must be a better way for us to talk about these issues. 🙏🏼
  • Happy #internationalyogaday I am forever grateful to this practice, to India, to my teachers: for showing me this way of living, and for bringing my wife @deepikamehtayoga into my life. However, I find it difficult to apologise for the colour of my skin and for my gender. Maybe this is a blind spot that I need to uncover. Some people may even say that marrying an Indian is another form of colonialism, and that teaching Indians as I have done, is another.
    There are many issues rising to the surface now which reflect a wider polarity occurring in society. On the one hand we are seeing the harm and abuse caused by men in the name of ‘Yoga’ exposed, and many are rightly calling for the patriarchal, hierarchical structure to be dismantled. On the other hand there are those who want to defend the tradition that allowed this to happen. Many of my friends have stopped teaching Yoga now because of the hypocrisy. It is reminding me of the way religion has been interpreted throughout history: where people have killed each other in the name of peace and love.
    One of the big problems is that no one can actually define what Yoga is. The way a woman in Saudi Arabia practices is going to be different from someone in Delhi or Los Angeles.... but then again what do I know ? I will be told that I’m just whitewashing and mansplaining. There must be a better way for us to talk about these issues. 🙏🏼
  •  5,584  342  21 June, 2019
  • “As you have undoubtedly noticed, the feminine is rising at last, overflowing the banks of every landscape, from politics to religion, from the world of entertainment to the fields of peace and justice. She is unconditionally loving, and she is deliciously irreverent. She is shifting the global paradigm from one of dominance and individualized salvation to one of collective awakening and service to all beings.” Mirabai Starr 🌟 
As we approach #InternationalYogaDay and the conversation around cultural appropriation continues, I can’t help but think of the early pioneers from the 1800’s like Ruth St Denis. In 1906 she performed, Radha, which drew from Hindu mythology. Wikipedia describes it as a piece that was, “A celebration of the five senses and appealed to a contemporary fascination with the Orient. Although her choreography was not culturally accurate or authentic, it was expressive of the themes that St. Denis perceived in Oriental culture and highly entertaining to contemporary audiences. St. Denis believed dance to be a spiritual expression, and her choreography reflected this idea.” I find this line to be particularly poignant- “it was not culturally accurate or authentic”. Perhaps it’s time to recognise and accept that Western/Modern Yoga is not culturally accurate or authentic(ly) Indian - and that is ok! It is what it is. It doesn’t have to be Indian anymore - even if it continues to draw inspiration from it (India). It is taking on its own shape and form - heavily influenced by the feminine - and it is helping the lives of millions of people around the world. 
Something that is worth considering... 🙏🏼
  • “As you have undoubtedly noticed, the feminine is rising at last, overflowing the banks of every landscape, from politics to religion, from the world of entertainment to the fields of peace and justice. She is unconditionally loving, and she is deliciously irreverent. She is shifting the global paradigm from one of dominance and individualized salvation to one of collective awakening and service to all beings.” Mirabai Starr 🌟
    As we approach #InternationalYogaDay and the conversation around cultural appropriation continues, I can’t help but think of the early pioneers from the 1800’s like Ruth St Denis. In 1906 she performed, Radha, which drew from Hindu mythology. Wikipedia describes it as a piece that was, “A celebration of the five senses and appealed to a contemporary fascination with the Orient. Although her choreography was not culturally accurate or authentic, it was expressive of the themes that St. Denis perceived in Oriental culture and highly entertaining to contemporary audiences. St. Denis believed dance to be a spiritual expression, and her choreography reflected this idea.” I find this line to be particularly poignant- “it was not culturally accurate or authentic”. Perhaps it’s time to recognise and accept that Western/Modern Yoga is not culturally accurate or authentic(ly) Indian - and that is ok! It is what it is. It doesn’t have to be Indian anymore - even if it continues to draw inspiration from it (India). It is taking on its own shape and form - heavily influenced by the feminine - and it is helping the lives of millions of people around the world.
    Something that is worth considering... 🙏🏼
  •  2,706  156  20 June, 2019
  • Following up on the post from two posts back... I was asked a great question, “How would you teach Adho Mukha (Downfacing Dog) to beginners?” 💎 It can be daunting at times, especially as the more you learn, the more you know how much you don’t know. 🤔There is also the danger of ‘paralysis by analysis’. 🤓
So, my advice, and the way I’m approaching it now, is to continue with the ‘traditional’ approach while adding in supplementary/complimentary exploration of joint mobility. 🥇
1️⃣So for Adho Mukha 🐕 I would look at Open-Chain (fancy term that means the hands are not fixed to the floor or wall) Scapular control, while moving the shoulders through different degrees of flexion/abduction. This is way harder than it looks 😰and I was struggling by the end of this as the arms went over head - so you have to keep in mind that most beginners won’t be able to do this well. It’s a long term project - not a quick fix. 💪🏼 2️⃣Second I would look at Open-Chain shoulder axial rotations - internal/external at various degrees of shoulder flexion/abduction. 
3️⃣Third is to take this progression to the floor - i.e Closed-Chain. Starting in a child’s pose and progressively loading more weight by lifting the hips, then the knees off the floor until reaching a Downward Dog. 
Simultaneously there should be spinal segmentation work done to learn how to tilt the pelvis in both directions - anterior/posterior as well as extend and flex each vertebrae of the spine segmentally. 
If all these elements come together then the student should develop enough self awareness to find their own expression/version of the pose. ✅
One of my goals now is to educate my students so that they become better practitioners and teachers than me. In the process we can use the practice as the  way that we can evolve and grow as humans. 🧘‍♂️ 🤸‍♀️ 🏄🏽‍♀️
  • Following up on the post from two posts back... I was asked a great question, “How would you teach Adho Mukha (Downfacing Dog) to beginners?” 💎 It can be daunting at times, especially as the more you learn, the more you know how much you don’t know. 🤔There is also the danger of ‘paralysis by analysis’. 🤓
    So, my advice, and the way I’m approaching it now, is to continue with the ‘traditional’ approach while adding in supplementary/complimentary exploration of joint mobility. 🥇
    1️⃣So for Adho Mukha 🐕 I would look at Open-Chain (fancy term that means the hands are not fixed to the floor or wall) Scapular control, while moving the shoulders through different degrees of flexion/abduction. This is way harder than it looks 😰and I was struggling by the end of this as the arms went over head - so you have to keep in mind that most beginners won’t be able to do this well. It’s a long term project - not a quick fix. 💪🏼 2️⃣Second I would look at Open-Chain shoulder axial rotations - internal/external at various degrees of shoulder flexion/abduction.
    3️⃣Third is to take this progression to the floor - i.e Closed-Chain. Starting in a child’s pose and progressively loading more weight by lifting the hips, then the knees off the floor until reaching a Downward Dog.
    Simultaneously there should be spinal segmentation work done to learn how to tilt the pelvis in both directions - anterior/posterior as well as extend and flex each vertebrae of the spine segmentally.
    If all these elements come together then the student should develop enough self awareness to find their own expression/version of the pose. ✅
    One of my goals now is to educate my students so that they become better practitioners and teachers than me. In the process we can use the practice as the way that we can evolve and grow as humans. 🧘‍♂️ 🤸‍♀️ 🏄🏽‍♀️
  •  3,346  137  17 June, 2019
  • Happy International Surfing Day - lol humans love making a ‘day’ for everything now... too bad I can’t actually surf at the moment (in case you’ve been wondering what that white thing is in my hair 😂 - I had a surfing accident 🔪 which could have been a lot worse - you can only cut through a skull so deep until you hit 🧠 and shit gets real 😬).
The time out of the water, and not being upside down on my hands, has forced me to be more still and to reflect on a few of life’s more meaningful questions. It has been a good opportunity to gain some clarity around what is important. 
I’m very excited about the upcoming intensive here in Bali - we are going to go deep this month. 🙌🏼🙏🏼
  • Happy International Surfing Day - lol humans love making a ‘day’ for everything now... too bad I can’t actually surf at the moment (in case you’ve been wondering what that white thing is in my hair 😂 - I had a surfing accident 🔪 which could have been a lot worse - you can only cut through a skull so deep until you hit 🧠 and shit gets real 😬).
    The time out of the water, and not being upside down on my hands, has forced me to be more still and to reflect on a few of life’s more meaningful questions. It has been a good opportunity to gain some clarity around what is important.
    I’m very excited about the upcoming intensive here in Bali - we are going to go deep this month. 🙌🏼🙏🏼
  •  2,141  90  16 June, 2019
  • How many degrees of freedom do you have in your approach? For example, how many ways can you do a downward facing dog? When you think about all the possible combinations of each major joint-complex in the body at any one time then the possibilities are almost infinite. 
This question, in my opinion, is one that I would like to see yoga teachers/educators addressing as we move forward. For a long time we have been using, as our sources of reference, anatomy books based on an arbitrary ideal of what a yoga posture should look like. 
Nowadays, if a student comes to me and wants to do a particular pose the way it is done in a picture they saw in a book, then I’m happy to help them achieve that, but I want them to know that there is nothing mystical or sacred about that - I want to educate them so they have options. 
It’s a bit like the current obsession with a ‘straight’ handstand - it’s useful to know what is required for that, and if it’s even possible, but to also know that it’s not the only way to do a handstand.
That being said - I’m not advocating total randomness in practice. There needs to be a systematic approach, I would just like to see a more informed, less dogmatic, approach to how we are teaching ‘alignment’.
  • How many degrees of freedom do you have in your approach? For example, how many ways can you do a downward facing dog? When you think about all the possible combinations of each major joint-complex in the body at any one time then the possibilities are almost infinite.
    This question, in my opinion, is one that I would like to see yoga teachers/educators addressing as we move forward. For a long time we have been using, as our sources of reference, anatomy books based on an arbitrary ideal of what a yoga posture should look like.
    Nowadays, if a student comes to me and wants to do a particular pose the way it is done in a picture they saw in a book, then I’m happy to help them achieve that, but I want them to know that there is nothing mystical or sacred about that - I want to educate them so they have options.
    It’s a bit like the current obsession with a ‘straight’ handstand - it’s useful to know what is required for that, and if it’s even possible, but to also know that it’s not the only way to do a handstand.
    That being said - I’m not advocating total randomness in practice. There needs to be a systematic approach, I would just like to see a more informed, less dogmatic, approach to how we are teaching ‘alignment’.
  •  3,342  188  14 June, 2019
  • Greeting from a rainy morning here in Bali. Finding the ‘Minimum Effective Dose (MED)’ is something I’ve been considering for a while in my ‘Mysore style Ashtanga’ practice as I try to find the balance between my love for that, and all the other passions and commitments in my daily life. 
After 20 years it’s something to consider as the physical aspect of the practice is time and energy consuming - and there’s only so much of that we have in a day. For example, I find that the ‘MED’ for sitting meditation to be between 15-20 minutes per day - optimally 2x per day. Then pranayama could be around 10 minutes. So how much time is left for the physical practice? 
I’m in the fortunate position that this is my life and work so that when I’m not teaching I can dedicate extended periods of time and many hours a day researching and experimenting. At the moment all my explorations are complimentary to each other - developing mobility: strength and flexibility. 
That being said, there are stages we all have to go through and what I’m understanding more and more is that my process is different to what others need. The skill in teaching is to be able to know that difference. Trying to skip steps and jump straight to the MED before doing the hard yards is not going to work if the goal is to go deep into the practice - whatever that practice is - but knowing the MED is going to be very useful during times of increased work/family/social demands. 
In this video: one of my favourite sequences which hits a lot of bases all in one (these are my personal adaptations of the ‘traditional’ way) handstand, leg behind the head, mechanical advantage V-Sit/modified Manna, hollowback, backbend, Hindu push-up. 🙏🏼
  • Greeting from a rainy morning here in Bali. Finding the ‘Minimum Effective Dose (MED)’ is something I’ve been considering for a while in my ‘Mysore style Ashtanga’ practice as I try to find the balance between my love for that, and all the other passions and commitments in my daily life.
    After 20 years it’s something to consider as the physical aspect of the practice is time and energy consuming - and there’s only so much of that we have in a day. For example, I find that the ‘MED’ for sitting meditation to be between 15-20 minutes per day - optimally 2x per day. Then pranayama could be around 10 minutes. So how much time is left for the physical practice?
    I’m in the fortunate position that this is my life and work so that when I’m not teaching I can dedicate extended periods of time and many hours a day researching and experimenting. At the moment all my explorations are complimentary to each other - developing mobility: strength and flexibility.
    That being said, there are stages we all have to go through and what I’m understanding more and more is that my process is different to what others need. The skill in teaching is to be able to know that difference. Trying to skip steps and jump straight to the MED before doing the hard yards is not going to work if the goal is to go deep into the practice - whatever that practice is - but knowing the MED is going to be very useful during times of increased work/family/social demands.
    In this video: one of my favourite sequences which hits a lot of bases all in one (these are my personal adaptations of the ‘traditional’ way) handstand, leg behind the head, mechanical advantage V-Sit/modified Manna, hollowback, backbend, Hindu push-up. 🙏🏼
  •  1,704  78  13 June, 2019
  • A little bit of Yoga inspired Handbalancing or is it Handbalancing inspired Yoga ?🤔 If it’s not about the ‘what’, and it’s about the ‘how and why’, and intention is what counts, then the lines get blurred. 
I’m happy to be back upside down after laying low for the last 6 days since my surfing accident. It was also interesting to practice these movements since none of them are really part of my current daily practice - so it was good to see the carry over/transference of my handbalancing focused practice into more Yoga type movements. I could do with a little work on my handstand walks 🙃and front split transitions. Have a great day everyone 🙌🏼
  • A little bit of Yoga inspired Handbalancing or is it Handbalancing inspired Yoga ?🤔 If it’s not about the ‘what’, and it’s about the ‘how and why’, and intention is what counts, then the lines get blurred.
    I’m happy to be back upside down after laying low for the last 6 days since my surfing accident. It was also interesting to practice these movements since none of them are really part of my current daily practice - so it was good to see the carry over/transference of my handbalancing focused practice into more Yoga type movements. I could do with a little work on my handstand walks 🙃and front split transitions. Have a great day everyone 🙌🏼
  •  3,413  96  11 June, 2019
  • ❗️#crotchalert When I saw @hanadoesyoga post this hashtag a few months ago I cracked up 😂. Seriously though, do either of these images offend you? I find it both very interesting, and completely confounding, to understand where we are at as a culture nowadays in terms of what is and what is not appropriate. Is it ok for a man and not for a woman to expose their crotch? Or are both in bad taste? Even though we are now well into fourth-wave feminism #freethenipple I still find there to be a lot of judgement around women putting themselves “out there”: especially in regards to the ‘yoginis in bikinis’. Have we even evolved since Raquel Welch back in the 80’s? I found this interview with her from 2017 - quite insightful for someone who was doing ‘Yoga’ in swimsuits way back when. “When you start yoga and you become a yogini so to speak, your sensitivity changes and you feel more things in a profound way. So you’re more aware. And also – there’s a thing that happened to me, I don’t know if it happens to everybody but I felt like, over my life, I had certain emotional blocks of difficult times where I tried to stuff back an experience because it was painful or worrisome, or I didn’t know for sure if I was doing the right thing.
And they stay in your body. These blocks stay in your body. All of a sudden when I started the yoga I would be in a standing pose balanced on one leg – bow pulling pose or something – and I was standing there and the minute has gone by and all of a sudden I felt tears dripping down my face and I was kind of surprised. It was an unlocking of some emotional thing that I had been through that had never been resolved.
I know that sounds kind of spooky and goofy but it did happen and then I started to realize ‘Oh maybe not all of the blocks that I break through will not be as dramatic as that one but they are things that have been broken through.’ I do think that it is very cleansing and very energizing. I know that sounds like I’m a crazy zealot or something but I’m not. I don’t do yoga too much anymore because Bikram doesn’t teach it and I don’t want to go to the cuckoo birds that teach yoga nowadays.”
That last line though 🐦😂🙏🏼
  • ❗️ #crotchalert When I saw @hanadoesyoga post this hashtag a few months ago I cracked up 😂. Seriously though, do either of these images offend you? I find it both very interesting, and completely confounding, to understand where we are at as a culture nowadays in terms of what is and what is not appropriate. Is it ok for a man and not for a woman to expose their crotch? Or are both in bad taste? Even though we are now well into fourth-wave feminism #freethenipple I still find there to be a lot of judgement around women putting themselves “out there”: especially in regards to the ‘yoginis in bikinis’. Have we even evolved since Raquel Welch back in the 80’s? I found this interview with her from 2017 - quite insightful for someone who was doing ‘Yoga’ in swimsuits way back when. “When you start yoga and you become a yogini so to speak, your sensitivity changes and you feel more things in a profound way. So you’re more aware. And also – there’s a thing that happened to me, I don’t know if it happens to everybody but I felt like, over my life, I had certain emotional blocks of difficult times where I tried to stuff back an experience because it was painful or worrisome, or I didn’t know for sure if I was doing the right thing.
    And they stay in your body. These blocks stay in your body. All of a sudden when I started the yoga I would be in a standing pose balanced on one leg – bow pulling pose or something – and I was standing there and the minute has gone by and all of a sudden I felt tears dripping down my face and I was kind of surprised. It was an unlocking of some emotional thing that I had been through that had never been resolved.
    I know that sounds kind of spooky and goofy but it did happen and then I started to realize ‘Oh maybe not all of the blocks that I break through will not be as dramatic as that one but they are things that have been broken through.’ I do think that it is very cleansing and very energizing. I know that sounds like I’m a crazy zealot or something but I’m not. I don’t do yoga too much anymore because Bikram doesn’t teach it and I don’t want to go to the cuckoo birds that teach yoga nowadays.”
    That last line though 🐦😂🙏🏼
  •  2,726  152  10 June, 2019
  • Let’s talk about the neck... I used to think that my neck was a weak link - I’m that guy that would wake up with a ricked neck, or it would happen in headstand or doing a backward roll out of shoulder stand. One time my wife, @deepikamehtayoga sneezed 🤧 in bed and it ricked my neck! True story 🤦‍♂️ Since I’ve been doing my morning Controlled Articular Rotations (CARS) I’ve noticed a massive improvement in how my neck feels and moves. I used to be scared in yoga classes, or movement classes, when the instructor would ask me to do vigorous neck circles or even to take my head behind my ears in extension (beginners/those with neck problems should always take care when doing this), but with my daily CARS I’ve seen big improvements. 
There is a direct carry over into my yoga practice as well - as many postures - particularly standing poses like Parsvakonasana (side-angle) and it’s variations, can be significantly improved by following the same movement pathway as the Neck CARS taught in Kinstretch and FRC. Too often I see students throwing their heads back, as if their head is on another person’s body, in the attempt to look at the hand. 
The approach I’m now advocating is to practice these movements in conjunction with - but separately from - the yoga practice, and then to try to implement the movement pathways into the poses. In this case practicing the Neck CARS while seated on standing - moving (with low tension) through flexion, rotation, side-flexion and extension - while avoiding any pinching or pain. Then finding this same pattern in different yoga postures - for example this Gomukhasana variation and doing a 1/2 to 3/4 neck circle:
Chin to chest, then rotate and attempt to look behind the shoulder (or up to the ceiling in this case). Then a slight side bend and extension to look at the hand. To come out I reverse it and continue all the way back through to a 1/4 in the opposite direction by looking to the floor before coming up. By continuing to grease the neurological groove in this way we can bring about a lot of improvement to the health of our necks - and I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want that! 🙏🏼
  • Let’s talk about the neck... I used to think that my neck was a weak link - I’m that guy that would wake up with a ricked neck, or it would happen in headstand or doing a backward roll out of shoulder stand. One time my wife, @deepikamehtayoga sneezed 🤧 in bed and it ricked my neck! True story 🤦‍♂️ Since I’ve been doing my morning Controlled Articular Rotations (CARS) I’ve noticed a massive improvement in how my neck feels and moves. I used to be scared in yoga classes, or movement classes, when the instructor would ask me to do vigorous neck circles or even to take my head behind my ears in extension (beginners/those with neck problems should always take care when doing this), but with my daily CARS I’ve seen big improvements.
    There is a direct carry over into my yoga practice as well - as many postures - particularly standing poses like Parsvakonasana (side-angle) and it’s variations, can be significantly improved by following the same movement pathway as the Neck CARS taught in Kinstretch and FRC. Too often I see students throwing their heads back, as if their head is on another person’s body, in the attempt to look at the hand.
    The approach I’m now advocating is to practice these movements in conjunction with - but separately from - the yoga practice, and then to try to implement the movement pathways into the poses. In this case practicing the Neck CARS while seated on standing - moving (with low tension) through flexion, rotation, side-flexion and extension - while avoiding any pinching or pain. Then finding this same pattern in different yoga postures - for example this Gomukhasana variation and doing a 1/2 to 3/4 neck circle:
    Chin to chest, then rotate and attempt to look behind the shoulder (or up to the ceiling in this case). Then a slight side bend and extension to look at the hand. To come out I reverse it and continue all the way back through to a 1/4 in the opposite direction by looking to the floor before coming up. By continuing to grease the neurological groove in this way we can bring about a lot of improvement to the health of our necks - and I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want that! 🙏🏼
  •  1,498  51  7 June, 2019